Gandhak ki Baoli

Looking upwards through the well.
Looking upwards through the well.

Built by Iltutmish in the early 13th century, it is the oldest Baoli in Delhi. It stands today as one of the very few early Sultanate structures built before the arrival of the true arch in the subcontinent. A number of ‘double columns’ reassembled from demolished Hindu temples were used during its construction – a feature found commonly in early Sultanate structures such as the nearby Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque.

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The Khirki Masjid

The open courtyards give rise to an elegant play of light and shade as one walks through the bays.
The open courtyards give rise to an elegant play of light and shade as one walks through the bays.

Constructed around 1375 AD, during the reign of Firoz Shah Tughlaq, the Khirki Masjid is one of the very few covered medieval mosques of the country. It is said to be one of the seven mosques built by the Sultan’s prime minister, Khan-i-Jahan Tilangani. The mosque is square in plan, 15 bays wide each way and covered by a partially domed and partially flat roof. The roof is punctured by four symmetrically placed, open to sky courtyards. A series of windows pierce the exterior walls on three sides, at the end of each bay, probably giving the mosque it’s name. (Khirki=Window)

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Tomb of Ghiyas-ud-din Tughlaq

The Tomb.
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Built during the years 1320-25, the tomb of Ghiyas ud din Tughlaq, the first ruler of the Tughlaq dynasty, stands like a small fortress off the Mehrauli – Badarpur road, directly opposite the Tughlaqabad fort. The tomb was built by the Sultan himself, and is a brilliant example of the early Indo – Islamic style. The structure sits within a fortified pentagonal enclosure, with the heavily battered walls and corner turrets characteristic of Tughlaq era buildings. The tomb itself is square in plan, with it’s walls battered upwards and crowned by a dome.

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